HIKING THE CHILKOOT TRAIL-PART 2

artist residency, Chilkoot Trail
img_1169

I am still so happy after 2 weeks of eating out of a titanium cup.

The Chilkoot Trail Artist Residency is an award of two weeks living on the Chilkoot Trail, the historic Klondike Gold Rush Trail running from Dyea Alaska to Bennet British Columbia. It is where over 100,000 people traveled to seek their fortune in Dawson City, Yukon, though very few made it and even fewer got rich. The trail is only 33 miles, but the steep 3000-foot climb destroyed many of the gold seekers and over 100 years later that still created anxiety for many of the hikers. Trail runners can cover the distance in one to two days, many hikers, speed through it in 3, leisure hikers in 5 days, but we had 14 days.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Views along the first section of the Chilkoot Trail

One the US portion of the trail, Alaska, there is Finnegan’s Point, Canyon City, Pleasant Camp, Sheep Camp, Happy Camp, Deep Lake, Lindeman City, Bare Loon and Bennett Lake. The first four camps are in Alaska and the last five in British Columbia. The entire Alaska side is in the wilderness, except climbing the boulder fields to the pass. It then opens up into the most spectacular scenery I have known.

imgp0071

Our first Chilkoot Trail river crossing

We quickly got our routine down. Hike at a decent pace to our next camp, pitch our tents, felt the water, put anything with a scent, all food, toiletries, gas canisters, cook pots, bug dope, stove, etc., into the bear lockers. The area is home to both black and brown aka grizzly bears, and it is imperative not to invite them into camp with your food. We would then cook and eat our dinners, mine was usually dehydrated soup mix with couscous or dehydrated mash potatoes.

My “worst” meal, because I ran short of food calculating two weeks was 12 days instead of 14 (clearly I was not thinking) was a mixture of instant mash potatoes and a small handful of pistachios. But you know, no matter what one eats, it always tastes good out in the woods. I would often skip breakfast, but I still had coffee, lunch was often almonds. It may sound dismal, but I had carefully planned three meals a day plus snacks, 2000 calories each day, into little ziplock backs. I just ran short a couple of days, which was not a big deal.

I see so many hikers with tons of unwanted and food, fearing they will starve in their short hikes I cringe at how heavy their packs must be. I would rather be mildly hungry than carry unwanted and excess items. I already had almost 50 pounds of gear on my back, with my art supplies and 200 bingo games.

I had my tent, sleeping bag, rain gear, one pair of pants, one pair of shorts, two short sleeve shirts, one long sleeve shirt, a hat, gloves, puffy jacket, 12 pairs of underwear. I can wear the same t-shirt and shorts for two weeks straight as long as I have a change of underthings. I had my MSR pocket rocket stove, two small gas cans, matches, lighter, toothpaste, sunscreen, lotion, bug repellent, parks communication radio, and a giant can of bear spray. I had all I needed.

Continued at Part 3 coming next week.  If you did not see Part 1, click here

Artists, don’t forget the application for the Chilkoot Trail Artist Residency is due February 1, 2019. click here for details at the Yukon Art Center . 

Hiking the Chilkoot Trail-Part 1

artist residency, Chilkoot Trail

This post was written initially October 6, 2018, but held back until the Chilkoot Trail Artist Residency Applications opened on January 5, 2019.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Klondike!

 

As I write this, I am on-board a flight to New Mexico, for our annual Abiquiu Open Studio Tour. This downtime gave me time to recount one of my most amazing and rewarding adventures as an Artist in Resident on the Chilkoot Trail with the Yukon Arts Center.

On July 20, 2018, I boarded a flight from Albuquerque, NM to Juneau, Alaska where I would meet my hiking buddy, Nancy Morrill. Nancy who would arrive at the same as me was flying from Saranac Lake, NY. Our flights got in at 11pm, and we were quick to get to our Airbnb on Douglas Island so that we could get to sleep before our first big adventure.  The following morning, we met hired guide, from ABAK to take us out onto the Mendenhall Glacier. We could not have asked for better guides. The two female guides managed our group exceedingly well. They were immensely knowledgable about the geologic history of the glacier and equally strong in handling fatigued person situations. ABAK fully outfitted us with climbing gear, safety equipment, even water, and snacks. It was a spectacular and beautiful experience with the opportunity to learn about how climate change is affecting Mendenhall.

The following morning, we boarded with all our gear the fast ferry, Alaska Fjordlines,  to Skagway. The small boat with about 40 people made numerous stops to watch the whales, harbor seals and sea lions play in the water.  Captain Glen would stall the ferry each time we saw a whale or a seal colony.  It was a beautiful 4-hour trip that also goes to Haines, AK before arriving in Skagway.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Captain Glen of Alaska Fjordlines

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Leaving Juneau on the fast ferry

Despite being 45 minutes late due to all the whale watching, Kerry, owner of the Swaying Spruce Cabin was there to pick us up.  She drove us through the tiny tourist town and up the hill to her cabin. It is a delightful area, only 1.5 miles out of town but away from the hordes of cruise ship tourists. We had a couple of nights to get ready for our big adventure. I took a nine-mile run down to the NPS campground where we would stay the evening before hiking the Chilkoot Trail, the official start of my residency. We spent the morning with the NPS staff getting our bear avoidance, radio, and trail training. Both NPS and Canadian Parks are partners with the Yukon Art Center’s residency program. I packed close to 200 Chilkoot Bingo Games plus boxed sets that I gave to NPS, Alaska Geographic and Skagway Traditional Council, all of whom are sponsors and donors to the artist residency.

With our training complete, food all packed we were dropped at the campground. I was so excited to begin the hike. We pitched our tents and went out for a 6-hour walk into the ghost town of Dyea, now a beautiful campground. We stopped in at the only place to eat in Dyea, the Chilkoot Trail Outpost where we drank local beer and ate salmon sandwiches. While there, we met a couple who just completed the Chilkoot Trail and wouldn’t you know it, they are also from New York, and they live less than 5 miles from Nancy in the Adirondack Park!

Hilary Lorenz and Nancy Morrill

Hilary Lorenz and Nancy Morrill with our last beer and a proper meal before heading onto the Chilkoot Trail

Nancy and I said goodnight and went to our campsite, I was almost too excited to sleep. The following morning we began the trail with a half mile of the rugged, muddy mess. I imagined that the first mile or two are wildly popular for day hikes and the path gets pretty beat up, and yes, it soon became less torn up. The first night we would stay in Finnegan’s camp, a short 4-mile hike through the woods. We met two couple there, both men were military, and they all live in Anchorage. I pulled out the bingo games, and they pulled out the boxed wine and cigars. I passed on both. This was the first official Chillin’ on the Chilkoot Bingo game, and the first night I answered the park service’s call in with my handle, “Artist 3.”

The Chilkoot Trail

artist residency, Chilkoot Trail, Exhibitions

If you follow my blog, you saw numerous posts as I prepared for my  Chilkoot Trail Artist Residency in 2018.  Now you get a glimpse into the trail I hike from Dyea, Alaska to Bennett Lake, British Columbia. This beautiful video was shot and edited by the awesomely talented Steve Hossack who lives in Anchorage Alaska.

I spent two days with Steve and Sarah Frey who is the marketing and development director at the Yukon Arts Center while they filmed my final days on the trail.  They are both incredibly charming people and were a blast to work with.

The Chilkoot Trail Artist Residency application is now open, the deadline to apply is February 1, 2019. Click here to Apply

Over the next few days, I will make several posts about my project, the trail, and my preparation, so stay tuned!

Red Hook Open Studio

Uncategorized

This weekend, November 10 and 11th from 1pm to 6pm, me along with about 70 other artists will open our studios to the public. I am very excited to share with you the Red Hook Open Studio information. It will be my first open studio since moving to Red Hook, Brooklyn, two years ago.

Plan your free self-guided walking tour by using the online map https://www.redhookopenstudios.com or pick up a map at Red Hook business or studio during the event. My studio is at 461 VanBrunt Door 14 across the street from Fairway Market, right by the waterfront. And now you can take the New York City Ferry!

Hilary_Lorenz_openstudio.jpg

Moth Migration Project Opens in Canada

Moth Migration Project, Prints, Uncategorized

sm_hilarylorenzposter

I have been in the lower48  less than a month, and I have yet to write up my lifechanging backpacking extravaganza on the Chilkoot Trail about my Artist Residency with the Yukon Art Center. But until I do that, I have another adventure in Canada to tell you about,  this one in New Brunswick.

Opening on September 28, 2018, at the Sunbury Shores Art and Nature Centre is a new Moth Migration Installation. This exhibit focuses on artist’s handmade moths from Canada and Maine.

hilary_lorenz_print_workshop14

Also, I will host a Moth Migration Printsocial at Sunbury Shores and I invite you to drop by the gallery on Saturday to print and add your own moths to the exhibit. I will be bringing my hand press up from New York. I look forward t seeing you.

The Moth Migration Projected is a crowd-sourced collection of handprinted, drawing and cut paper moths exhibited in multi-sensory installations. Choosing moths, a nocturnal pollinator, as the vehicle for cross-pollination and international exchanged, I use social media to invite people to create paper moths native to their geographic location.  To learn more go to: http://mothmigrationproject.net

Chillin’ on the Chilkoot Bingo

Chilkoot Trail, Prints
RACK_OF_PRINTS_BINGO_LORENZ

Chilkoot Bingo cards in the drying rack.

I outdid myself with the complexity of my Chilkoot Bingo game. I created Chilkoot Bingo as a part of my Chilkoot Trail Artist Residency. Sponsored by the Yukon Arts Centre, Parks Canada and the US National Park Service and the Skagway Arts Council with support from the Skagway Traditional Council and Alaska Geographic I will be taking a creative journey hiking through Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park, Alaska, and Chilkoot Trail National Historic Site, British Columbia. Carrying everything in my backpack for two weeks and sleeping on the trail, I will offer two nights of game playing, one in Alaska and one in Canada. I have fabulous cash and prizes in the form of chocolate coins and other goodies to those who play and win Chilkoot bingo with me.

BLOCKS_CARVING_LORENZ

The linoleum and woodblock carvings of Chilkoot Bingo items.

I began the Chilkoot Bingo cards by making 25 wood and linoleum block prints of animals from the Yukon,  and hiking items such as a tent, boot and coffee pot. The 25 carvings, which range in size from 4″ x 6″ to 5″ x 7″ were printed onto paper and took just over 150 hours to create.

Hilary_lorenz_woodcuts

Inked up linocuts and woodcuts for the Chilkoot bingo Cards.

Once the carvings were printed and photographed, I made a digital layout of the Bingo Cards, downloading fonts made from real wood type from the late 1800’s, the peak of the Klondike Gold Rush.

Chilkoot_Bingo_Digital_Lorenz

Chilkoot Bingo digital layout for silkscreen

I created the design in Photoshop that was eventually shot onto transparency film so that I could make silkscreens.  Every bingo card needs to be different and silkscreening made the most sense to me. The layout took a full day, about 10 hours to finish.

screen_hilary_lorenz

Freshly shot silkscreen prior to printing.

I sent my files over to my friend Roni Henning who is a professional artist and screen printer. She has a good studio for printing and helped me shoot the films onto the screen and begin printing.

hilary_lorenz_screen_chilkoot

Hilary Lorenz examining the new silkscreen.

 

Hilary_lorenz_silkscreen

Every single object needs to be printed one at a time onto the bingo cards. For example, I print a bat in one spot, move the game piece, then print the bat in the next place. To complete the entire set of 24 game pieces onto 200 bingo cards, I pull ink through the screen  4800 times. I printed the background separately, another 50 pulls.  In the video clip, you can see me print 4 pulls, imagine doing that almost 5000 times! I should be able to complete these in about 50 hours.

If you were paying really close attention, you would say, “wait a minute, you  only made 24 objects, and bingo needs 25.” You are so right. The middle section, the free space will be an embossed gold nugget. I created a rubber stamp.

 

gold_nuget_bingo_lorenz

Gold nugget rubber stamp

The rubber stamp will be pressed into embossing ink, then sprinkled with gold powder. I  seal the stamp with a heat gun, and the gold powder magically puffs up making a textured embossed surface. This is a pretty quick process, maybe 2 to 3 hours to complete.

My final step will be screen printing my information and a special thank you to all the sponsors and supporters on the back. Each card will be one of a kind, and ever hiker lucky enough to get one and play Bingo will have something extraordinary. I am willing to bet there nowhere in the history of bingo card making has anyone spent over 225  hours making 200  5″ x 7″ cards. But then again there are no better Bingo cards than these!

If on July 29, 2018, you find yourself at Sheep Camp, along the Chilkoot Trail, (the last camp on the US side of the trail)  you can try your luck at Bingo and keep your card.

Or if on August 3, you are at the Chilkoot Trail, Lindeman Camp on the Northeast summit of Chilkoot Pass in British Columbia you are in luck and can play Chilkoot Bingo.

This is the only place these cards and the game playing will happen. It is a special event reserved for those I meet on the trail. I can’t wait to see you there.

I will also do conventional artist talks about my work and experience on the trail in Whitehorse Canada, on August 8th and Skagway Alaska August 10.

See you in the Yukon!

Chilkoot_bingo_lorenz

One version of 200 different Bingo Cards

Moth Migration Interns wanted.

Moth Migration Project, Prints, Uncategorized

Screen Shot 2018-05-16 at 6.44.48 PM

The Moth Migration Project needs one or two interns or assistants to prepare for our next series of exhibitions. You can work in person or virtually as I need both.

I will keep this short and sweet. The Moth Migration Project will open a new exhibit at the Heard Natural Science Museum, in July 2018, Sunbury Shores Arts & Nature Centre, St. Andrews, NB, Canada, September 2018, and the Bundaberg Regional Gallery, Bundaberg, Australia, April 2019. I can’t do this alone. Would you like to contribute to this amazing project?

Here are the basics of what an intern or assistant may do. I should add this is currently an unpaid job until funding comes in.

Duties: Receive and Catalog paper moths, Update Google Database to reflect the collection, email participants to confirm delivery of artwork, send postcards to recognition to participating artists, scan or photo moths for entry into database and website, engage artists and makers through social media to participate in project by making moths, help prepare for exhibition in July at the Heard Natural Science Museum, TX, in September in Canada and April 2019, Australia. Engage in brainstorming ideas for fundraising and community printmaking workshops. Learn to work  with a fiscal sponsor.

Skills in any of the following areas: printmaking, gallery management, library science, museum studies, social media marketing, fundraising, administration or a simple willingness to learn.

Interns will learn about printmaking and drawing mediums, museum and gallery archiving practices, social media marketing strategy, strategic planning for major and multiple events, community programming. They will also be trained on using Google forms, sheets and email and how to integrate it into business practices. The Intern will learn about fiscal sponsorship and how to create a campaign for project funding. The intern will be invited to create an original artwork via linocut printing and participate in the MMP exhibitions.

If you are in NYC, we will work in my studio in Red Hook Brooklyn. Ideally, you will come at least one day a week. If you are virtual, we can still work together quite efficiently.

College students may arrange college credit. Please write a two to three paragraph email describing why you want to intern with the Moth Migration Project, what you hope to learn and what skills you can offer. Please email mothmigration@gmail.com

I look forward to hearing from you.

Be the first to make a tax deductable donation!

Moth Migration Project

Moth_Migration_Donate
I have tremendous news, the Moth Migration Project is now a fiscally sponsored project of the Brooklyn Arts Council!

To get this fundraising campaign started:

  • The first 10 people to donate $250 or more will received an 8″ x 10″ signed and numbered drypoint moth etching!
  • The first 25 people to donate $100 or more will receive an 8″ x 10″ signed and dated linoleum block moth print.
  • The first 100 people to donate $50 will receive a commemorative MMP postcard.

This remarkable news means that your financial contribution is a tax-deductible charitable donation that goes directly to support this project.  Tax-deductible donations will have an enormous impact on MMP’s  future. Administered by the Brooklyn Arts Council, just click here and go to  Give Lively to donate. 

The Moth Migration Project spans all cultures, ages, countries. It is a tool for community building in both physical and digital worlds. The Moth Migration Project is about the spirit of belonging, and it encourages personal creativity and human connection. I am inviting you to be a part of that relationship.

The Moth Migration Project is a massive undertaking. With your donations I will:

  • Offer free community moth printmaking workshops worldwide specifically aimed at the underserved  from young children to older adults.
  • Hire “Moth Ambassadors” to create community in their local areas.
  • Mount interactive moth exhibitions that encourage  public engagement
  • Launch the expanded MMP website to show off every artists moths, and make it searchable!
  • Develop grade appropriate curriculum for learning communities in the environmental sciences and arts.
  • Build a physical archive to preserve the moths so curators may use to create additional traveling exhibitions.
  • Foster community spirit with a  love and appreciation of the arts and sciences

To date, I received incredible support from Speedball Art, Inc. who generously donated ink, rollers, and papers for printmaking workshops. Susan Martin, Founding Directors of Some Serious Business, gave beautifully written public relations and marketing support for the first exhibition of the Moth Migration Project. I received tremendous support from friends who counted, stamped, cataloged and installed the moths. I could have never done this first year without their big-hearted help.

Now, I am asking for your financial support to launch the next phase of this vital project. Just click here and go to  Give Lively to donate. 

Your donations will further my work in building the physical and digital community spirit that fosters genuine connections and engages public participation representative of the Moth Migration Project. Help me to create shared experiences that embrace and celebrate mutual respect for personal uniqueness, creativity and the nature around us.

Financial contribution is not required in any way to join the MMP. If you, your family, your community or school want to join the project and become part of an international movement, just click the “join” link and follow the directions.

My Sincerest Thank You.

Hilary Lorenz

 

So Many Updates

Moth Migration Project, Prints, Small Print Store, stonetrigger press
Hilary_Lorenz_StonetriggerPress_abiquiu

StoneTrigger Press Abiquiu, NM

I have so much to tell you about. But first, It is Open Studio  in Abiquiu, NM October 7 and 8. I am flying back from Brooklyn to participate.  Stonetrigger Press will be open,  to the public with a huge sale on prints and drawings.

Hilary_Lorenz_StoneTriggerPress_Interior

StoneTrigger Press Abiquiu, NM

I will also have loads of one of a kind journals, but it is only for these two days. For more about the AST, maps, times and artists, you can check the website by clicking here.  There are 31 stops but multiple artists at each stop. Make sure to come to stop 4!

journal_sale_1

Hilary Lorenz Hand Printed One of a Kind Journals

The Studio Tour is from 10am to 5pm.  My studio is at 5 Trigger Drive. From 84, take NM554 (The El Rito Road) 1/2 mile, turn right on CR 142, drive 1 mile to Trigger Drive. It is on your left. There will be signs!

20170925_HilaryLorenz_WaveHill_0179

Hilary Lorenz photographed by Da Ping Luo at Wave Hill, Bronx, NY 2017

I have two  exhibitions happening simultaneously. On September 10th, the exhibition, “Call and Response” Wave Hill, Bronx, NY opened. Wave Hill’s curatorial team  invited artists who have shown in the Sunroom over the last ten years to return and present new responses, encompassing an exhilarating reexamination of the site, 50 artists, including myself, created work for the show. The exhibition runs through December 3 and it is amazing!

20170925_HilaryLorenz_WaveHill_0052

The Making of a Rock Garden by Hilary Lorenz, 2017, photographed by Da Ping Luo, Wave Hill, Bronx, NY

My work is installed in Wave Hill’s  Sunroom Gallery with it’s beautiful arched windows. and incredible light. The piece is hand cast flax pots, filed with laser cut plants and tiny rocks hung to form a 7 x 7 grid of 49 pots. This work is my reflection of the tiny plants in Wave Hill’s Alpine House.

Screen Shot 2017-10-03 at 12.51.58 PM

Next the Moth Migration Project website went live! The MMP is an on-going multi-venue international project that engages communities in both science and art through the crowd-sourcing of handmade paper moths. In the first 6 months I collected, almost 15,000 moths from 24 countries.

1_moth_migration_us

Moth Migration Project installation of 4,000 moths at 516Arts in Albuquerque, NM 2017

The premier exhibition is currently on view at 516Arts in Albuquerque, NM. The exhibition opened August 19, 2017 and will run through Nov 11, 2017. This exhibition shows close to 4,000 of the 15,000 moths collected.

5_Moth_MIgration_Project

View of walls and ceiling of the Moth Migration Project  by Hilary Lorenz at 516ART, 2017

4_Moth_migration_project

View of walls and ceiling of the Moth Migration Project  by Hilary Lorenz at 516ART, 2017

This project will continue. I have a commitment letter from the Bundaberg Regional Galleries, Bundaberg, Australia to show the project April to June 2019. This exhibition will focus primary on Australian moths, so I highly encourage all Australian’s of all ages and  profession, you do not need to be an artist, to check the instructions and send moths to the project. Click here for Instructions 

In addition I have proposals to two Canadian Art Centers and  US Galleries. It does not matter where you live, I really want to hear from you. Please consider being a part of this amazing international group. We also have a FB group, click here for the link.

After Open Studio I will get to work on my on a project for next summer.  I was selected a 2018 artist for the Chilkoot Trail Artist Residency Program by Parks Canada, US Parks Service and The Yukon Arts Center for my project “Trail Magic.” “Trail Magic” engaged other backpackers along the trail with a barters system I devised based on hand printed cards of hiking equipment. I get to spend time backpacking and making art in both Alaska and British Columbia. I may never come back to Brooklyn.

It is an extraordinary fall with lots of exhibitions, open studio, and projects underway for the next two years. I hope you can join me along the way.

 

 

Moth Migration Project

Moth Migration Project

I am thrilled to be partnering with Susan Martin at Some Serious Business and to release the official press kit for the Moth Migration Project. For further information, images, and interviews contact: Some Serious Business Susan Martin susan@someseriousbusiness.org.  Click here to download the MMP Press Release Kit. 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.